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PALLADIAN DESIGN: THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UNEXPECTED

The new RIBA exhibition opens on the 9th September and explains why Andrea Palladio is the only architect who has given his name to a style – one that is still in use around the world after nearly 500 years.

 

From the US Capitol to a 21st century Somerset cowshed, 'Palladian Design: The Good, the Bad and the Unexpected' introduces Palladio’s design principles and explores how they have been interpreted, copied and re-imagined across time and continents from his death in 1580 to the present day

By focusing on his legacy, this exhibition explores how British architects such as Inigo Jones and Lord Burlington turned Palladianism into a national style. It follows how the style was adopted in the design of houses, churches and political buildings around the world from New Delhi to Leningrad. It shows how 20th and 21st century architects have reinterpreted Palladio’s design principles for contemporary use in unexpected ways. 

The buildings featured may conform to, or challenge, ideas about Palladian architecture. Either way, their inclusion is intended to provoke debate and raise questions about the authenticity of a form of architecture increasingly removed from its original time and place.

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Amsterdams Welvaren

We have just finished a new commission of Amsterdams Welvaren. Opened in 1830, the house was the first kindergarden in the Netherlands and in 1947 it was  recognized by the Nobel Prize Association for its dedication to improving the well-being of children.

Lying in the heart of Amsterdam there is a special building that is hard to miss. Its unique architecture and rich history have made it into one of the city’s cherished landmarks. A history that brought three nations together from the ashes of war to create a building with a mission. 

Amsterdam's Welvaren is a story centuries in the making. A ship that turned into a building. A building that made its mark on the world. Welcome onboard!

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NEW MODEL Completed for Eltham Palace ReOpening

A few weeks ago we completed a new model for English Heritage for the grand re-opening of Eltham Palace, Greenwich London. 


The site is now dominated by the stylish house built in 1933–6 by the architects Seely and Paget for Stephen and Virginia Courtauld. They incorporated the great hall – the most substantial survival from the medieval royal palace – into the design. Like the house, the palace’s 19 acres of gardens feature both 20th-century and medieval elements.

Side Entrance to Eltham Palace

Side Entrance to Eltham Palace

The model can be purchased from he English Heritage Online Store here 

The model is available in two sizes at £195 and £100.

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RIBA Collections Revealed: Article available at www.architecture.com

CORK MODEL OF THE TEMPLE OF VESTA, TIVOLI, 1770

Copied across the world, this influential Roman ruin exists as a model in our collections.

Copied across the world, this influential Roman ruin exists as a model in our collections.

The Temple of Vesta at Tivoli was one of the must-see attractions for Grand Tourists in the 18th and 19th centuries. This evocative model, showing the temple (dating from 1st century BCE) in ruins, was made around 1770-90 and is one of the oldest in our collections.

Cork models of classical antiquities were often sold as souvenirs to those visiting the Roman Campagna. This model may be one of a number that were exhibited in London by the modelmaker Richard Du Bourg (Dubourg) from 1799, some of which ended up in the collection of the South Kensington Museum.

The model is currently on long-term loan to the British Galleries at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Image: Cork model of the Temple of Vesta, Tivoli, Italy, made between 1770 and 1790
Model maker: Unknown, possibly Richard Du Bourg Credit: RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections
— Article by Catriona Cornelius British Architectural Library, RIBA 21 May 2015

The Timothy Richards Workshop made a restored replica of this model last year which is exclusively for sale from The Sir John Soane Museum Shop. www.shop.soane.org


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Sir John Soane's Model Room

THE FINANCIAL TIMES MAGAZINE WWW.FT.COM

Written by Liz Jobey

This month we were lucky enough to be featured in an article for The Financial Times magazine which introduces the newly refurbished Sir John Soane's Model Room. The full article can be read on the FT Website here.

One model definitely in need of some loving care is Fouquet’s fragile “Choragic Monument of Lysicrates”, which was badly damaged during the war: a ruined, once perfect model of a ruin.

“The model lost its dome,” says Timothy Richards, who works with the Soane and is one of very few model-makers skilled enough to repair it. “That’s the main problem with Fouquets,” he says from his workshop in Bath. “Plaster is such an elegant material. It has wonderful qualities. It is a very porous material, and, left alone under its dome, it’s completely happy. But the thing about Fouquet models — as soon as they lost their glass domes they were doomed.” For him, the Fouquets count as geniuses. “The tiny tiles on the Choragic Monument . . . are exactly correct according to the Stuart drawing [made by the architect James Stuart in 1752-54]. If you count across, they are exactly spot-on. At that kind of scale, it’s unbelievable.”

— Liz Jobey interviewing Timothy Richards for FT magazine

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New model for the Bodleian Library

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New model for the Bodleian Library

This month we have been working on a new model for The Bodleian Library in preparation for the opening of their new exhibition,  Remembering Radcliffe: 300 years of science and philanthropy. 

new radcliffe model

The model will be available to buy from the Bodleian Library Shop from the 10th December, just in time for Christmas. www.bodleianshop.co.uk 

Opening times:
Monday to Friday  9am-5pm
Saturday 9am-4.30pm
Sunday 11am-5pm

'The Libraries' winter exhibition celebrates the life and legacy of John Radcliffe, a physician and philanthropist who left a lasting mark on the University and city of Oxford. Radcliffe had an uncanny ability to accurately diagnose and successfully treat many of his patients, including Queen Anne, and on his death left the bulk of his fortune to charitable causes.'

'The exhibition considers his legacy to Oxford, and the three buildings in the city which bear his name: the Radcliffe Infirmary, the Radcliffe Observatory, and the Radcliffe Camera: the first circular library in Britain, and one of the country’s most distinctive and recognisable buildings. The exhibition will also look at Radcliffe's ongoing legacy in the work of the Radcliffe Trust as it marks the 300th anniversary of his death.'

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